Haensel and Gretel

Haensel and Gretel

Hello, I’m Gretel.  The big guy on your left was Haensel.  We were rescued as kittens in 2004 and became part of the Gibson family. Though he had FIV, Haensel lived happily for eleven years.  I’m still doing fine at 12+ thanks to good care from Dr. Ackerman at Belmont Pet...
Toby

Toby

Toby is a 12 year old Bengal cat. This is back home after a recent office visit with Dr. Ackerman. He’s thinking “I’m such a sweet angel. I don’t know what the 3 vet techs are talking about saying that it took 3 of them to do my blood draw and cut my nails...
Gus

Gus

This is a photo of Gus after his visit w/ Dr. Ackerman on 9/14. His exact age is unknown, but we’ve had him for 2 years, 1 month. He was adopted from the Peninsula Humane Society. From Gus: “I am a wiggly guy, so I appreciate Dr. Ackerman’s patience & her understanding of me. She is so kind & I know she cares about...
Ruckus and Maya

Ruckus and Maya

The picture to the left is Ruckus James Coltrane Vance, 10 weeks, 6 days. He is a red fawn French bulldog puppy. The picture to the right is his (not-the-same litter mate) sister, Maya Katherine Frida Vance, 9 weeks, 5 days. She is a brindle French bulldog puppy.     Here’s what they had to say about their visit to Belmont Pet Hospital: “On our second visit to the Belmont Pet Hospital, we came in for our next round of puppy shots. Our mom, Stephanie Vance, had to go to her own doctor’s appointment and run some errands. We hung around for a few hours and the staff took excellent care of us; we can’t wait to go back! Everyone was so good to us that when we got home, we crashed out on the couch next to mom!” -Ruckus and Maya...

Is Your Cat Missing the Litter Box?

You have a problem. Your cat is thinking outside the box, and not in a good way. You may be wondering what you did to inspire so much “creative expression.” Is your cat punishing you? Is Fluffy just “bad”? No, and no. House soiling and missing the litter box is a sign that your cat needs some help. According to the Winn Feline Foundation, house soiling is the number one complaint among cat owners. The good news is that it is very treatable. An accredited veterinarian can help you determine if the problem is medical or related to social or environmental stressors. In addition to a complete physical exam, the doctor will ask you specific “where and when” questions. Health factors Tony Buffington, DVM, PhD, a specialist in feline urinary disorders at The Ohio State University, and founder of the Indoor Cat Initiative says that many veterinarians recommend a urine test for every cat with a house soiling problem. The urinalysis will determine if blood, bacteria, or urinary crystals are present — signs that your cat might have feline lower urinary tract disease (FLUTD). FLUTD is very common and can cause painful urination. Cats that begin to associate the litter box with pain will avoid it. Other medical possibilities include hyperthyroidism, kidney disease, diabetes, and arthritis and muscle or nerve disorders that might prevent your cat from getting to the litter box in time. Environmental factors If there is no medical cause, the next step is to look at environmental factors. Start with the litter box. Your cat might be avoiding the litter box because it is not cleaned...

Dog Safety Tips for Memorial Day

  Like many Americans, you may be planning a festive Memorial Day, complete with barbecue and fireworks. It’s important to remember, fireworks and dogs don’t mix. Unlike people, dogs won’t associate the noise, flashes, and burning smell of pyrotechnics with a celebration. Fireworks will often cause panic and anxiety in dogs. It’s important to remember that dogs panic at the sound of fireworks and flee into the night, often winding up lost, injured, or killed. Keep your pet indoors at all times, if possible. Use Pet Friendly Repellent. Don’t give your pet table food.   Source: http://tiny.cc/4x14ex      ...

April as National Pet First Aid Awareness Month

The American Red Cross has dedicated April as National Pet First Aid Awareness Month.  It is important to have emergency supplies for your pet ready at all times. When a pet faces an emergency, pet owners know to turn to AAHA-accredited hospitals for the care their pets need. Now, it’s easier than ever before to locate an accredited hospital, thanks to the American Red Cross’ new pet first aid mobile phone app. Accredited hospitals are the only hospitals to be featured in the new app. The app features AAHA-accredited hospitals in its Vet Hospital Locator tool, which allows users to find accredited hospitals when looking for a veterinarian. Users can locate hospitals by using both hospital name and the user’s current location. Searching by the user’s current location enables pet owners to find the nearest accredited hospital in times of emergency. Unlike human hospitals, not all animal hospitals are required to be accredited. Accredited hospitals are the only hospitals that choose to be evaluated on approximately 900 quality standards that go above and beyond basic state and provincial regulations. These hospitals are recognized among the finest in the industry, and are consistently at the forefront of advanced veterinary medicine. AAHA standards are continuously reviewed and updated to keep accredited practices on the cutting edge of veterinary excellence. “We know from our research that 90 percent of pet owners will seek an accredited hospital once they understand that not all animal hospitals are accredited,” said Michael Cavanaugh, DVM, DABVP, CEO of AAHA. “The AAHA-Accredited Hospital Locator makes it very easy for pet owners who value the bond they have with their...

Heartworm Disease

Heartworm disease poses a major health threat to both dogs and cats, and it’s on the rise. Present throughout the United States and Canada, the disease strikes pets, if unprotected by preventive heartworm medicines, who have been bitten by a mosquito carrying contagious microfilariae. A mosquito becomes a carrier of heartworm disease after it bites an infected animal. With the blood of the animal, the mosquito also takemicrofilariae, which circulate in the animal’s blood and are the young offspring of adult heartworms living in the animal’s heart.     Once in the mosquito, the microfilariae take 10 to 14 days to mature into infective larvae, after which they are ready to infect animals the mosquito goes on to bite. Only certain animals are commonly susceptible to contracting heartworms, and cats and dogs both make the list, though the disease remains more prominent in dogs.  Contact us today if your pet is not up-to-date with their heartworm medication!        ...

Christmas Pet Safety

“My pet would never eat food off the table!” “My pet would never knock over the Christmas tree!” “My pet would never bite someone!” We all know our pets pretty well, but what we don’t always realize is that stress can make anybody do crazy things! When you have holiday guests or flashing Christmas lights or loud holiday music—or all of the above—at your house all at once, your pet may get stressed and frustrated, causing them to act out in unexpected ways. Most pet accidents are met with the statement, “He’s never done anything like that before!” We recommend always making sure that your pet has a safe place to sit and relax during your holidays parties. Just like some people, pets need to get away from the action and de-stress, but most of the time they don’t know how to ask for their space. If your pet is comfortable in their crate, we recommend moving it into a quiet room and letting them spend some time resting during your holiday get-togethers. Your pet will be happier, and by extension, you and your guests will be happier! And holiday disasters will be...
Belmont Pet Hospital - Animal Care Pet Hospital for dogs, cats and exotic pets + dog boarding, cat boarding, dog bathing and cat bathing.
539 Harbor Blvd Belmont, CA 94002
Phone: (650) 593-3161